Review: The Story Of Lucy Gault

The Story Of Lucy Gault
The Story Of Lucy Gault by William Trevor

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

‘The Story of Lucy Gault’ was shortlisted for the Man Booker prize way back in 2002, and like anything shortlisted for a prestigious award, you know the quality will be there: the writing was crisp, the characters unique and a well defined voice carried the novel.

And that’s where my problem lies.

This was a good story, a statement of how multiple lives can be affected by a single incident, made in the heat of the moment. It would’ve fitted neatly into a short-story, or padded and stretched into a novella, but in novel form the pace trundled along like the characters residing in the family house at Lahardane: briskly at first, then staggering and crawling towards the end of their days.

Remember the final scenes of the last Lord of the Rings film? Tears were shed, hugs were given, characters stared purposefully into the sunset? The audience reached for their jackets and grabbed their handbags, gobbled down the last of the popcorn, only for another ‘final’ scene to be shoehorned into life.

For me, Lucy Gault’s story was the same: it finished way before the end. You knew where it was going, where it had been, and I was continually flipping to the end to see how many pages remained.

Still, a rambling William Trevor is still an enjoyable William Trevor, so worth taking a nose.



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Review: Full Dark, No Stars

Full Dark, No Stars
Full Dark, No Stars by Stephen King

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This novella collection was a mixed bag. All were written with Stephen King’s usual relaxed and readable style, but a few felt lazy, as though he rushed them down without exploring and developing the what-if’s like he normally does. Fair Extension is a good example. The story, even brief as it was, plodded towards a predictable ending. That said, it’s still Stephen King; when he’s not at his best he’s still yards ahead of the pack.



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Review: Jeeves and the Wedding Bells

Jeeves and the Wedding Bells
Jeeves and the Wedding Bells by Sebastian Faulks

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Note: I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in place of an honest review.

I must confess I’ve never read Wodehouse. He’s one of the authors who’s persistently remained midway on my to-read list, keeping Chekhov and Elmore Leonard company. One day, if I can resist slipping in other authors, I’m sure they’ll climb to the top. My only history with Jeeves and Wooster comes from the television series back in the 80s (90s?), so when reading this book, Fry and Laurie continued acting out their roles in my head. I’m more familiar with Sebastian Faulks, since, like the rest of world, I have read and enjoyed Birdsong and Charlotte Gray.

Faulks did a good job with this book. I loved the writing – the language of the oddball characters, Wooster’s thoughts – the words had a bounce and energy that was fun to read. Faulks captured the time and the place perfectly, transporting you back to that Charleston era where everyone who was anyone walked about with a cocktail in their hand. After reading this, Wodehouse has certainly been nudged up the list.

My only complaint, a very minor one, was that the story did drag. All the ingredients of a good farce were present: hidden identities, unrequited love, overheard conversations, but for me at least, a few of those chapters could’ve been tightened around the waist.

All in all, it was a fun read and recommended!



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Review: Digging to America

Digging to America
Digging to America by Anne Tyler

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I read Anne Tyler’s ‘Accidental Tourist’ many years ago, so long ago that I wouldn’t be able to remember the plot if the film hadn’t refreshed my memory. But one thing I clearly remember about that novel was quality of the writing – how easy it was to read and how each word was perfectly placed.

‘Digging to America’ has that same familiar style, as though it’s being narrated by someone you’ve known since childhood. This is a bigger accomplishment than it may sound, since the POV character changes with each chapter. Maryam, an Iranian immigrant to American, is the main character, but other chapters are told from her daughter-in-law’s POV, others from her would-be suitor, the widowed Dave, and one from a young child, one of the Korean orphans.

The book is subtle. At a glance, nothing happens, but what’s left out is as important as those scenes which were put in. Family tensions are shown by the wave of a hand or a passing comment layered with ambiguity.

This certainly won’t be everyone’s cup of tea, but if you like quality literature told in an authoritative voice, this will be worth a look.



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Review: Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency

Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency
Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency by Douglas Adams

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I was really looking forward to this book. I reread Hitchhikers recently and have watched the Stephen Mangan’s Dirk Gently production and loved them both. As an aside, I provided the crew’s electricity for the fish and chip shop scene. A guy knocked on my door one night with a power lead in his hand and asked if he could plug it in – Dirk Gently would’ve loved the interconnectedness. Although this read like a typical Douglas Adams story – lots of sciencey bits, a disgruntled robot and clever dry humour – it was a bit too random for me. Still, a good read, and it’s made me want to dust off the rest of my Hitchhikers series.



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Review: Look Who’s Back

Look Who's Back
Look Who’s Back by Timur Vermes

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Note: I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in place of an honest review.

It’s easy to take offence at the concept of ‘Look Who’s Back’ (Hitler miraculously regenerates in modern-day Berlin) but read it first before making a judgement. Timur Vermes does an excellent job of ridiculing the Nazi ideals while staying within Hitler’s thought process. He broaches on the darker elements of World War II and the horrors committed by the Nazi regime, yet he always treats those events with dignity by highlighting the ridiculousness of Hitler’s agenda. This is a humorously dry satire, very well written (and translated) and well worth a read. Top marks!



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Review: Narcopolis

Narcopolis
Narcopolis by Jeet Thayil

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Narcopolis is a rambling story consumed within a narcotic haze that flits between characters and times, drifting decades at a time. It’s hard to explain what the story is about. Imagine trying to recall a dream: some parts will be clear, others foggy and unclear, while others will seem pointless or nonsensical, but you have an overriding feeling that at the time it was enjoyable. Thayil can write, that’s indisputable, and if you like poetic prose you’ll enjoy this but be warned, this book reads like a drug hit: you’re likely to be disappointed if you like clear narratives and structured plots. To misquote Wallace Stevens, this “is a book too mad to read before one merely reads to pass the time”, and like the drugs, the madness is addictive.




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Review: Page After Page: Discover the Confidence & Passion You Need to Start Writing & Keep Writing

Page After Page: Discover the Confidence & Passion You Need to Start Writing & Keep Writing
Page After Page: Discover the Confidence & Passion You Need to Start Writing & Keep Writing by Heather Sellers

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

‘Page after page’ is one of those books that probably sits better with American readers, no offence to my friends on the other side of the Atlantic. Us Brits are a cynical lot, we just like to be told where we’re going wrong and how to fix it, everything else is fluff, padding that gets in the way. Motivational razzmatazz, ra-ra pep talks, ‘you are the centre of your world’ kind of sentiments, all that stuff appeals to America’s go-get-em culture.

I stopped reading this book twice but kept finding it buried under papers on my desk, so both times I continued reading. On the third occasion, I admitted defeat and with some sadness returned it to my bookshelf. I had wanted to like it, but I found myself getting frustrated by Heather’s style of writing, her constant use of minuscule sentences. That fragmented style, and the upbeat positivity made me feel as though I was trapped in a childcare nursery.

I’ve given this book three stars since it does contain some sound advice that other reviewers found helpful, but I hate to say it, I gave up before reaching the end.

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Thoughts on writing, publishing and some general drivel