Review: Tribe of Mentors by Timothy Ferriss

‘Tribe of Mentors’ is an odd book – I’m not sure who it was aimed at. The book contains the verbatim transcripts of interviews from his podcast – if you’re a frequent listener, as I am, then you get nothing new. If you weren’t, and you hadn’t heard of Tim Ferriss, picking up this book would leave you confused – there’s no solid theme to the order of the interviews and no conclusion after each highlighting the takeaways. it just seems a jumble without direction. Tim has just relocated to Austen, and my cynicism thinks he needed some cash for a down payment on a house.

But if you do enjoy his (free) podcasts, and you should – they’re fantastic, this is a reasonable way of throwing a few coins into his hat to say thank you – so 4*s for that rationale.

Book kindly supplied by Netgalley for an honest review.

See review on Goodreads.

Review: An Ocean of Minutes by Thea Lim

On paper, “An Ocean of Minutes” should have been right up my street. I like a bit of time travel, love a bit of romance, and dystopian fiction is generally worth a nose. However, Thea Lim’s first novel seems a bit lost and searching for an audience. The general premise (woman travels forward in time, will her man wait for her?) is a theme worthy of adult fiction, but the method of time travel and the implausible, simplistic environment is better suited to a YA audience.

The Time Travel element feels like it was shoe-horned in to attract a certain audience or to ride the wave of recent romantic time travelling films – I wouldn’t be even mildly surprised if you told me the first draft had Polly frozen in stasis rather than time travelling. There were no time issue conundrums as you would expect in a society that have discovered both forward and backward travel.

I also found the writing overblown, with too much detail given unnecessarily to irrelevant passages, and I did find myself skimming heavily in the final 40%. The style was solid YA, the dictionary remained tucked away in the drawer. The flip-flopping chapters that alternated between the historic and the current timelines were unnecessary – when this works well, as in Time Traveller’s Wife, there’s a relationship between the past and the present, here, the past didn’t develop the present.

But that said, and this is the true worth of any book, I did want to know how it would end and I did read to the end. So, a wobbly 4, but a 4 nonetheless.

Book kindly supplied by Netgalley for an honest review.

See review on Goodreads.

Review: Strangers on a Train by Patricia Highsmith

I’ve had interesting chats with strangers on trains, plains, busses, etc., and learnt some neat origami skills as a result. Luckily, there wasn’t a psychopath who wanted to kill my ex… This was a good book, but it did seem dated – the concept has been copied and improved many times, and the prose clumsy by modern standards (for example very wordy and POV switching mid-paragraph). Still, a good read and a solid 4* rating.

See review on Goodreads.

Review: The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck: A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life by Mark Manson

This is a fresh approach to self-help books – swear a lot, accept your problems (but choose them wisely), and tell people to stop aiming for the clouds and instead tackle those values that keep them in the gutter. There are definitely some interesting bits, particularly around values and simplifying your dreams, but I don’t think I’ll be changing my life in any way!

See review on Goodreads.

Review: The Crow Road by Iain Banks

I did struggle with Crow Road. It’s one of Iain Banks’s earlier novels, and it shows. I did enjoy The Bridge, which came out before, but that was focussed on story – Crow Road is heavily character based, where the action is minimal, and the whodunnit doesn’t really start until three-quarters of the way through, and then fizzles out as fast as it started.

My problem with this novel is the over-writing – long rambling sections, which though well written, drag on and on. Likewise, the first-person point of view is littered with throw-away “aren’t I clever” lines, which eventually become tedious. By the half-way point, I found myself skimming paragraphs, and eventually, I was flicking over pages.

That said, the writing is good, and if viewed as the early work of a master, still has bits of interest to keep the reader going.

Book kindly supplied by Netgalley for an honest review.

See review on Goodreads.

Review: The Reader on the 6.27 by Jean-Paul Didierlaurent

I realised I loved Jean-Paul Didierlaurent’s The Reader on the 6.27 when I took offence at “trousers corkscrewing” down someone’s legs – they don’t corkscrew, they concertina. The writing (and Ros Schwartz’s translation) is so elegant and poetically rhythmic, that the rare off-word pulls the reader out of Guylain Vignolles’ magical world.

The blurb on the back of The Reader  unfortunately compares the book to Jean-Pierre Jeunet’s Amelie. While there are similarities, a comparison to something as perfect as Amelie can only make The Reader second best! That’s not taking away from the charm and romanticism of The Reader, it’s a very good book, but as I turned that last page, I was more tempted to recommend Amelie than The Reader.

While not perfect, it’s better than the coldly angular 4, and as the curvaceous 5 is more appealing (like Julie’s favourite numbers), it’s only fair to round up!

See review on Goodreads.

Review: Explore It!: Reduce Risk and Increase Confidence with Exploratory Testing by Elisabeth Hendrickson

This is a quick read and offers some sensible approaches to exploratory software testing. There’s no great insights, and personally I don’t feel I’m going to approach testing any differently as a result of this book, but it certainly contains information that others may find helpful.

See review on Goodreads.

Review: The Toy Makers by Robert Dinsdale

I’ve always loved magical realism, ordinary worlds elevated by enchantments. My bookshelves are lined with Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s books, I’ve been stunned by the capacity of Jorge Luis Borges, and more recently, I enjoyed The Night Circus (which will draw many comparisons with the Toy Makers). So it’s not a huge surprise that Robert Dinsdale’s The Toy Makers was right up my street.

The book is set in a toy shop in London, and spans the period from before and after the two world wars. It follows Cathy, pregnant while still a girl, and the life she made with the Godman’s, the father and his two sons who run the shop. The toys they make are magical, forged by recreating memories of childhoods lost, and every winter on the first frost of the year, they open their shop doors until the first snowdrop appears.

My only complaint about the book, and a minor one, is that the characters didn’t really form. The book covers 50 odd years, but by the end of it, you still don’t really know them, or more importantly, root for them. However, the writing was excellent, crisp and clean, the pace solid, and the ending was gorgeous.

A very solid 5/5, a must-read for lovers of the Night Circus.

Book kindly supplied by Netgalley for an honest review.

See review on Goodreads.

Review: How to be Champion: My Autobiography by Sarah Millican

My rating: 4 out of 5

This reads like it was knocked out by a ten-year-old with touerrets, but Sarah Millican’s autobiography, “How to be Champion”, has an endearing honesty that makes it very readable. She writes about her life, with each chapter appended by a few comic how-to-be-champion suggestions to get the book onto both the biography and self-help shelves.

If you’re a fan of Sarah Millican’s stage shows, which I am, then you won’t be disappointed – the self-deprecating humour is there, as is enough references to willies and bodily fluids to keep the fans content. You do find yourself reading it in her Geordie accent. Worth a look for fans of comedy.

Book supplied by Netgalley for an honest review.

See review on Goodreads.

Review: Fear by Dirk Kurbjuweit

My rating: 4 out of 5

Dirk Kurbjuweit has written a well-crafted literary novel that bounces around the life of the semi-autobiographical character Randolf, his highly strung but intelligent and gorgeous wife Rebecca, and their two children. He follows their turmoil as Dieter Tiberius, the downstairs neighbour, becomes more and more sinister, appearing to threaten his wife and their children. He explores what it means to be suspected of a serious crime, of abusing your kids, how you doubt yourself and your wife, and how you overreact to compensate against those vile accusations.

This is one of those books where you’re told the ending at the beginning – the story then fills in the details that led to that conclusion. For me, I wanted to understand what made the protagonist, a self-declared middle class pacifist architect, take the action that he and his family did. Yes, I can appreciate you want to defend your property, and yes, who wouldn’t take huge steps to protect their loved ones, but, and this is a big but, other options are always available – even something as simple as moving house. Because the ending was so fatal, I wanted (needed) that build up to be so fraught, so despicable, that no other outcome would be possible.

I kept reading, hoping that some event would occur that would tie his hands and force him down that course of action but sadly, this wasn’t the case – I didn’t feel that Randolf could justify his deeds, regardless of the threat posed by Dieter, and that, for me, broke the magic of the book.

Still, this is well written, excellently translated, and thought provoking, so a solid 4/5.

Book supplied by Netgalley for an honest review.

See Goodreads review.